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Xiaomi Mi LED Smart TV 4 review: A convincing debut

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s a brand in India, Xiaomi is still relatively new and yet has made a name for itself. So much so that it dethroned Samsung as the number one smartphone brand in the country. So it was inevitable that the brand would foray in segments as well. Xiaomi’s entry in the television market has generated quite a bit of curiosity. With the launch of Mi TV 4, the Chinese brand wants to expand its footprint in India. The Mi TV 4, which the company claims is designed keeping in mind the Indian audience. The TV comes with a 55-inch 4K resolution display and is priced at Rs 39,999. The company claims that the TV offers a better user experience as compared its counterparts present in the market.

We used the device for some time and here is our complete review…

Design and display
The Xiaomi Mi LED Smart TV 4 is surely one of the best looking smart TV available in the market. Looking at the TV one can easily make out the company has invested a lot in its design aesthetics. The smart television is very slim with only 4.9mm thickness. The device definitely has a thick bottom, where the company has placed all the internal circuit of the device. It comes with two metallic L-shaped stands and can also be mounted on the wall.

The television offers 3 HDMI ports, 2 USB ports, an Ethernet port and the AV input. Along with this, the device also offers Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. All these ports are placed on the rear of the device at the bottom. The minimalist design and bezel-less display of the TV makes sure that the viewers don’t shift their attention from the content to anything else.

Coming to the display, the Xiaomi Mi LED Smart TV 4 sports a Samsung manufactured 10-bit VA panel. The device offers 4K resolution with 3840×2160 pixel resolution. The 54.5-inch display has a refresh rate of 60Hz and contrast ratio of 6000:1. The smart TV is capable of producing colours with HDR capabilities. The TV can produce 1,024 colours as per primary colour instead of the 256 colours per primary colour which are offered by any other smart TV in this price segment.

With this TV Xiaomi is offering 4K resolution in a budget of Rs 40,000 which is often found in TV more than a lakh. Along with this, the display configuration also offers a great viewing experience. The design and display are surely the selling points of the device.

Remote control and mobile app
Taking cue from its TV design the company has also kept the design of the remote very simple. The remote is very sleek and come with few buttons.

It is made of plastic and supports two AAA batteries. The remote connects to the TV via Bluetooth so this means that you no longer have to point the remote in a particular direction to make it function.

Moreover, the TV remote also doubles up as a universal remote so you don’t have to use the bulky remote provided by your DTH operator to control the TV. The company also offers an additional accessory called the Mi IR set-top box controller which has to be bought separately. Users have to attach the cable with the TV so that they can use the remote for the TV as well as the set top box.

Users will also be able to control the remote with app available on the smartphone. The company has also introduced a mobile app which will enable users to control the Mi TV 4.

The app offers a clean and simple UI and it also enables the users to take screenshots of the TV and save it on the phone. it also offers a feature called app, that enable users to open apps on the TV from their smartphones. The app also offered an option to convert the phone into a gamepad.

Performance
Talking about the innards, the Xiaomi TV is powered by a 64-bit quad-core Amlogic T968 chipset clocked at 1.8GHz. The device offers 2GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage. The company claims that this is for the software updates and apps and users will not be able to download any TV shows on the internal storage.

Coming to the software, the Xiaomi Mi TV 4 runs PacthWall is own OS based on Android 6.0. The main highlight of PatchWall is that it keeps all the content in the front and you don’t have to look for it.

Users can stream content from the various apps available. The company claims that the TV offers 500+ hours of content. For the time being the company has partnered with Sony Liv, Hungama Play, Alt Balaji, Voot, Voot Kids and is working on some more associations. The user interface is pretty clean and you easily get a hang of it. It looks similar to the interface of LG’s webOS and is also quite interactive. You will notice thumbnails for the various TV shows and movies on the screen.

The top part of the screen consists of various categories such as Home, TV Shows, Kids, VIP, Movies, Sports and Music. All the categories consists of content related to that particular genre and only the VIP segment has the services for which one has to purchase the subscription. For the initial three months the Chinese manufacturer is giving free subscription for Hungama Play, Sony Liv and Alt Balaji.

As we said earlier the PatchWall OS is pretty interactive. It learns your viewing patterns and after that it will change the layout of your homepage based on your preferences. In order to play your favourite content you just have to tap on the thumbnail and the TV Show or movie will start playing.

However, if you don’t wish to scroll a lot for your favourite content then you can simply search for it. The part of the search is that it will show the content from the apps and also the one running on air at the time of the search.

On Air is an interesting feature of the Xiaomi smart TV. The Chinese manufacturer has partnered with companies that make electronic programme guides for DTH providers and cable operators. With the help of the service the PtachWall OS shows you the content on air along with the graph of how much of the TV show or movie you have missed and how much is remaining.

Along with this, the TV also offers support for voice commands so you can use that feature as well to look for the content. The OS also offers support for 15 Indian languages and you can set the interface of the TV in your choice of language.

The Xiaomi Mi TV 4 is made with the Samsung VA panel and it offers amazing colour reproduction and the viewing angles were also fine. However, you have to adjust the brightness and contrast from time to time for better viewing experience. The speakers are placed at the bottom and the audio output is also loud and clear. Users can also increase the audio output by pairing Bluetooth speakers with the smart TV. The TV offers good scaling of both HD and full HD content across the large display.

The only issue we had was with the resolution. The TV offers 4K resolution but there is not much content available for that. Even Amazon Fire Stick and Netflix also doesn’t offer content with that resolution. The user interface is smooth enough and the processor also offers lag free performance.
 Verdict

The Xiaomi Mi LED Smart TV 4 comes with a price tag of Rs 39,999. This is the only TV available in the market that offers all the high-end features at this price. Along with this, its minimalistic design and interactive operating system act as an added advantage. Unlike other manufacturers, the company also said that it will keep on rolling out timely updates for the TV in order to offer better user experience. So, if you are looking for a smart TV with 4K resolution, Android operating system, 55-inch display and have a budget of Rs 40,000 then this TV can surely be your pick as no other company is offering you such features in this budget.

Article Source: gadgetsnow.com

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Best tips to enroll in Online training courses in 2021

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People Management

Taking an internet course for the very first time? As a part of Coursera’s Teaching and Learning group, I have had the privilege to use countless teachers to deliver their classes to over 48 million individuals around the globe. According to research and best practices in our neighborhood, here are eight, go-to research strategies for studying online.

1: Set daily goals for analyzing

Ask yourself what you expect to do in your path every day. Placing a clear target can help you remain motivated and overcome procrastination. The goal ought to be specific and simple to quantify, for example”I will watch all of the movies 2 and finish the programming assignment” And do not forget to reward yourself once you make progress towards your objective!

Must check- People Management online courses

2: Produce a more dedicated study space

It is a lot easier to remember information if you are in precisely the exact same location where you learned it, so using a dedicated space in your home to take online classes will make your learning better. Eliminate any distractions out of the distance, and if at all possible, make it different from the bed or couch. A very clear differentiation between where you study and in which you take breaks will be able to allow you to focus.

3: Schedule time to research in your calendar

Open your calendar and decide on a predictable, dependable time which it is possible to devote to viewing lectures and completing missions. This helps make sure your classes will not turn into the very last thing on your own to-do list.

4: Keep yourself liable

Inform friends and family about the classes you are taking, article accomplishments to your social networking accounts, or site on your own homework assignments. Possessing a community and support system of family and friends to cheer you makes a huge difference.

5: Actively take notes

Taking notes may encourage active thinking, enhance understanding, and expand your attention span. It is a fantastic strategy to internalize understanding whether you are learning online or in the classroom. So, grab a laptop or locate an electronic program that is most suitable for you and get started synthesizing crucial points.

6: Join the conversation

Course discussion forums are a terrific place to ask questions regarding homework, discuss topics, share resources, and also make friends. Our study indicates that students who take part in the discussion forums are 37 percent more likely to finish a program. Thus make a post now!

7: Do you think at a time

Multitasking is significantly less effective than focusing on a single job at a time. Researchers from Stanford University found that”Individuals that are frequently bombarded with different streams of digital information cannot listen, remember information, or change from 1 task to another as well as individuals who finish one job at a time.” Stay focused on one thing at one time.

You will absorb more info and complete missions with increased productivity and ease compared to if you’re hoping to do several things at the same time.

8: Take breaks

Resting your mind after studying is essential to high performance. If you end up working on a difficult problem without a lot of advancement for one hour, have a rest. Walking out, taking a shower, or speaking with a buddy can re-energize you and also supply you with fresh ideas about the best way to undertake that job.

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Facebook’s virtual reality push is about data, not gaming

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VR systems

Facebook has announced the latest version of its successful standalone virtual reality (VR) headset, the Oculus Quest 2. The new device packs more computing power and a sharper screen than its predecessor, and is also US$100 cheaper.

The Oculus Quest 2 is the latest step in Facebook’s long-term strategy of making VR more accessible and popular. Facebook recently brought all its VR work under the umbrella of Facebook Reality Labs, it has announced new applications like the Infinite Office VR workplace, and will also require a Facebook login for future Oculus devices.

The compulsory link to Facebook has many consumers concerned, considering the social media giant’s chequered history with privacy and data. VR and its cousin, augmented reality (AR), are perhaps the most data-extractive digital sensors we’re likely to invite into our homes in the next decade.

Why does Facebook make virtual reality headsets?

Facebook acquired VR company Oculus in 2014 for an estimated US$2.3 billion. But where Oculus originally aimed at gamers, Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg wants VR for social media.

At the same event last year, Zuckerberg said Facebook sees VR as a pathway to a new kind of “social computing platform” using the enhanced feeling of “presence” that VR affords. For Facebook, the introduction of VR-based computing will be like the leap from text-based command line interfaces to the graphical user interfaces we use today.

This may well be right. VR affords a strong feeling of embodied presence that offers new possibilities for entertainment, training, learning and connecting with others at a distance.

But if the VR future is the one Facebook is “working in the lab” on, it will function via the company’s existing social computing platform and business model of extracting data to deliver targeted advertisements.

Virtual reality collects real data

A VR headset collects data about the user, but also about the outside world. This is one of the key ethical issues of emerging “mixed reality” technologies.

As American VR researcher Jeremy Bailenson has written:

…commercial VR systems typically track body movements 90 times per second to display the scene appropriately, and high-end systems record 18 types of movements across the head and hands. Consequently, spending 20 minutes in a VR simulation leaves just under 2 million unique recordings of body language.

The way you move your body can be used to identify you, like a fingerprint, so everything you do in VR could be traced back to your individual identity.

Facebook’s Oculus Quest headsets also use outward-facing cameras to track and map their surroundings.

In late 2019 Facebook said they “don’t collect and store images or 3D maps of your environment on our servers today”. Note the word today, which tech journalist Ben Lang notes makes clear the company is not ruling out anything in the future.

Virtual reality leads to augmented reality

Facebook wants to collect this data to facilitate its plans for augmented reality (AR).

Where VR takes a user to a fully virtual environment, AR combines virtual elements with our real surroundings.

Last year Facebook unveiled the Live Maps application, a vision of an expansive surveillance apparatus presumably powered by AR glasses and data collected from Oculus Insight. Live Maps will provide many minor conveniences for Facebook users, like letting you know you’ve left your keys on the coffee table.

Now Facebook have announced their first steps towards making this a reality: Project Aria. This will involve people wearing glasses-like sensors around Seattle and the San Francisco Bay area, to collect the data to build what Wired co-founder Kevin Kelly calls “the mirrorworld”, the next big tech platform.

People are rightly concerned about the ethical implications of this kind of data extraction. Alongside Project Aria, Facebook launched its Responsible Innovation Principles page, and they’re already quick to emphasise that faces and license plates will be blurred in this data collection.

As we have argued elsewhere, framing questions about VR and AR surveillance in terms of individual privacy suits companies like Facebook very well. That’s because their previous failings are actually in the (un)ethical use of data (as in the case of Cambridge Analytica) and their asymmetric platform power.

We need more than just ‘tech ethics’

Groups like the XR Safety Initiative recognise these emerging issues, and are beginning work on standards, guidelines and privacy frameworks to shape VR and AR development.

Many emerging technologies encounter what is known as the Collingridge problem: it is hard to predict the various impacts of a technology until it is extensively developed and widely used, but by then it is almost impossible to control or change.

We see this playing out right now, in efforts to regulate Google and Facebook’s power over news media.

As David Watts argues, big tech designs its own rules of ethics to avoid scrutiny and accountability:

Feelgood, high-level data ethics principles are not fit for the purpose of regulating big tech … The harms linked to big tech can only be addressed by proper regulation.

What might regulation of Facebook’s VR look like? Germany offers one such response – their antitrust regulations have resulted in Facebook withdrawing the headset from sale. We can only hope the technology doesn’t become too entrenched to be changed, or challenged.

But regulation has not always stopped Facebook in the past, who paid out US$550 million to settle a lawsuit for breaching biometric privacy laws. In the multi-billion dollar world of big-tech, it’s all a cost of doing business.

Another question we might ask ourselves is whether Facebook’s virtual-reality future and others like it really need to exist. Maybe there are other ways to avoid forgetting your keys.

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